House Pliscia & Chalet La Pedevilla by Pedevilla Architects

YEAR:

20122013

Pedevilla Architects tell us about the design of House Pliscia and Chalet La Pedevilla built in a small village in the Dolomites, made with local materials and in respect of the environment that hosts them.

House Pliscia – Chalet La Pedevilla – Pedevilla Architects – Photo: Gustav Willeit

Can you tell us about the Chalet La Pedevilla?

The landscape of Val Badia, In the heart of the Dolomite Alps is characterized by small clusters of rural houses called “viles”. These villages developed through the centuries on the steep slopes of the valley creating different structures. Characterized by their coherence and independence, each one of these small clusters of houses and farms represent a community, where neighborhood, solidarity and mutual assistance are qualities which are of fundamental and remarkable significance, still today.

The House La Pedevilla is located at 1200 meters above sea level, in the middle of the landscape of the “viles” and the beautiful Dolomites. The two shifted volumes, a single family house and a holiday rental house, carefully inserted in the mountain slope, are a reinterpretation of the local typology of the “couple huts”, traditionally a house and a farm. The Chalet can in this way be intended as a modern rural building.

The volumes have been built in concrete with an aggregate of dolomite stone. The types of wood used, larch and pine, are of regional origin and have been cut at a nearby forest during a particular phase of the moon, one year before the start of the construction.

The wooden external cladding creates a connection with the wooden buildings with integrated loggias of the area where the house is located.

House Pliscia – Chalet La Pedevilla – Pedevilla Architects – Photo: Gustav Willeit
House Pliscia – Chalet La Pedevilla – Pedevilla Architects – Photo: Gustav Willeit

Untreated and hand-crafted massive pine wood is used in the interior for floors doors windows and furniture and contrast beautifully with the white exposed-concrete used for walls, ceilings and some floors.

The local spring water, the passive solar energy, the use of geothermal energy and solar panels integrated in the roof produce enough energy to make the building self-sufficient.

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