THE TREE

MAG

Belt Furniture by DDAA

DESIGNER:

DDAA Lab  – Daisuke Motogi 

PHOTO:

Kenta Hasegawa

YEAR:

2020

PRODUCTION:

Japan

LINKS:

DDAA, @daisukemotogiKenta Hasegawa

The fact that details are exposed means that they can be disassembled and the mechanism can be understood easily. Especially in the case of spatial design, you can make changes without breaking anything if the details are exposed. There are many wires and pipes running inside the building, including electricity, water and other sanitary equipment, air conditioners, ventilation fans, and fire-prevention equipment in the interior of a building. If you want to make a minimalist wall, you need to conceal wires and pipes inside the wall so that frayed edges do not show.

It certainly looks more beautiful that way, but it would be more advantageous to make them visible to a certain degree for later maintenance and possible changes. So, I always try to design a state where exposed wires and pipes can be perceived in a positive way. In designing the Avex Artist Academy (2018), I came up with an idea of installing wires (which originally had to be concealed) behind glass so that they look like objects displayed in a showcase. As I mentioned in the section on FRAME (p.059), we may rediscover values and change our perspectives by treating things that we are used to seeing on a daily basis as something special. Rather than frantically trying to conceal wires, it is more interesting to come up with a way to make exposed wires look good. By creating a state where “noises” are accepted without reservations, we can make positive impressions of changes and modifications that may occur after the completion. This project also made me realize that glass and plexiglass have an effect similar to the “white cube” effect that we experience in museums.

To be a little more specific, we can symbolically highlight the disassemblable details that we have been experimenting with by using transparent materials to make all components except for the joints. The top and sides of the furniture piece designed for BANG & OLUFSEN Ginza (2019) are made of transparent plexiglass to make them less noticeable. The design is composed only of details, or the parts holding the boards together, without showing the boards that are usually the main feature of the design. “Kintsugi” exemplifies this idea, in which details have a great impact on the whole. It is a method of repairing chipped or broken tea bowls and vessels by gluing the pieces with lacquer and finishing with gold powder. Repairs of the cracks and joints themselves determine the overall impression of the vessel.

To be a little more specific, we can symbolically highlight the disassemblable details that we have been experimenting with by using transparent materials to make all components except for the joints. The top and sides of the furniture piece designed for BANG & OLUFSEN Ginza (2019) are made of transparent plexiglass to make them less noticeable. The design is composed only of details, or the parts holding the boards together, without showing the boards that are usually the main feature of the design. “Kintsugi” exemplifies this idea, in which details have a great impact on the whole. It is a method of repairing chipped or broken tea bowls and vessels by gluing the pieces with lacquer and finishing with gold powder. Repairs of the cracks and joints themselves determine the overall impression of the vessel.

Text provided by Designer

THE TREE MAG – The Fruits of Ideas